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Warhammer PC Games – Full List, Our Favorites, and Upcoming games

Introduction

The amount of PC games set in the Warhammer universes have been skyrocketing for the last couple of years, and it’s showing no signs of slowing down anytime soon.

There have been some great successes such as the Total War: Warhammer series, but there’s also been a lot of games that were just okay, and a couple that were terrible.

In this guide, we walk you through all the Warhammer PC games available, what factions from your beloved tabletop game you can expect to encounter in the various games, and give you an idea of what it’s like to play these games.

We also look at upcoming Warhammer PC games, and we’ll keep updating this article as new titles are announced or released all the time.

The feature image for our complete list of Warhammer PC Games

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Our Favorite Warhammer PC Games


Don’t want to browse through a list of 25+ games to find something good? Here’s some recommendations from each of the editors on Age of Miniatures.

Johannes’ favorite Warhammer PC Games:

Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor: Martyr (and the Prophecy expansion):

Martyr is a Diablo-like set in the Warhammer 40,000, and it’s a perfect match: You play as an Imperial Inquisitor (you can choose a number of different versions) and then click/button mash your way through the best of what the grimdark future has to offer: Nurgle Plague Marines, Drukhari wyches, swarms of Tyranid monsters – even Aeldari Howling Banshees make an appearance. Your weapons and armour are all very over the top and fit the 40k style perfectly.

The game was a bit of a mess when it was originally released, but today in 2021 it has turned into a very solid action RPG with a good story, tons of content, great loot with lots of ways to customize it, and some of the coolest enemies the 40k universe has to offer.

Warhammer: Vermintide II

I’m a big fan of Age of Sigmar, and I don’t have any nostalgic ties to the Old World of Warhammer Fantasy Battles, but it really is a great setting for video games.

Vermintide II is, in my opinion, the best use of the license out there. In this game, 4 players join forces to fight hordes of Skaven ratmen, horned beastmen or Chaos warriors in a fantasy version of Left 4 Dead, and while the game can be difficult at times, it’s never boring.

In late April 2021, the game got an update that introduces the new Chaos Wastes mode, which turns it into a rogue-lite game: Instead of playing random maps over and over again to get rewards, this mode lets you and your party fight through a series of missions while you upgrade your weapons and abilities in the hope of clearing the final, more difficult level.

If you beat the last level, you get some very good rewards, but if you fail just one mission on the way there, you have to start from the beginning.

It gives playing the game some purpose and direction that I don’t think it had before, and I highly recommend trying it out, even if you have previously grown tired of the game.

Renatos favorite Warhammer PC Games:

Total War Warhammer series

I have been a fan of the Total War series since Total War Rome I but actually never finished a campaign in any game, mostly because the most exciting part is the beginning. I have been in love with Warhammer Fantasy setting roughly the same amount of time.

Therefore, it was with excitement that I heard about the collaboration between Creative Assembly and Games Workshop. And I was not disappointed. Total War Warhammer kept me going for hours and hours (single player only) even rekindling my love for miniature games that brought me to a Games Workshop store and my first steps in the Age of Sigmar world.

Several hours later (many campaigns completed and few AoS armies painted after)), between all DLCs, the sequel, and the DLC’s sequel, I consider the game more of an investment than just pure entertainment. I have of course pre-ordered Total War Warhammer III and I’m waiting with bated breath for more news.

Starting now to collect every single piece of the game can seem an expensive journey, but they are heavily discounted during the major celebrations like Christmas or Steam Summer Sale. The good news is that you don’t need to buy everything from the beginning. The enemies will use the new cool stuff even if you don’t have the DLC, giving you the same experience of players with the DLC. Every time you want to try a faction that has DLCs in place you can buy them to extend your roster and gameplay potential.

The personal recommendation is to start with Total War Warhammer 2 core game and then expand with the different factions available on top. Once you are ready for the Mortal Empires (a bigger campaign containing the map from both games allowing to use the core races from the first game) then you can buy Total War Warhammer 1 and expand with the remaining DLCs. Wood Elves was one of my favourite from the first game (and Vampire Coast from the second game).

Peters favorite Warhammer PC Games:

So, I am last and all the “good games” are gone. Warhammer PC games are a bit weird for me. I love gaming on my pc and from time to time it is want I spend the most hobby time on. And for sure I love Warhammer. But Warhammer PC games? Most of the times they are just a bit junky.

Do not get me wrong: I love that the Warhammer license is giving out so freely. There are some amazing gems that would never be made if Games Workshop guarded the license more. I think other big franchises like Star Wars could learn a lot from this. But it also means that I have learned to set my expecations for Warhammer games very low and it is rare that I am super excited by a release. Even the ones that I like I seem to play less than I actually want (Vermintide, Total War and so on).

So maybe it is no wonder that the Warhammer games I have truly loved are the ones that, more or less, exactly copy a Warhammer board game.

Blood Bowl

Looking at my library of Warhammer games, this is by far the ones I have spend the most amount of hours in (and it is not even close). I just love Blood Bowl, but find that the board game takes too long and it is damn near impossible to get a real league going for long.

The best thing about Blood Bowl is building up that super awesome totally broken team. That you can do in the PC version and I just cannot get enough of it. When I needed to hand in my thesis my partner was away for a week so I could really “get some writing done”. At the end of the week I wash a complete mess. Nearly nothing had been written, but I had a super good Orc Team in Blood Bowl!

I cannot wait for the release of Blood Bowl 3 (that follows the rules for the new Blood Bowl Second Edition boardgame).

Full List of Warhammer PC Games Currently Available (by setting)


Warhammer 40,000 PC Games


Necromunda: Hired Gun

  • Genre: First-Person Shooter
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Escher, Goliath, probably more
  • Play this if you like: Wolfenstein: New Order
  • Price: € 39,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

This is an FPS with some role-playing elements set in the Necromunda setting. You play as a bounty hunter navigating the gang politics of the Underhive, and it actually looks like it’s getting both the setting and the gameplay right!

Aeronautica Imperialis: Flight Command

  • Genre: Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Imperium, Orks
  • Price: € 22,99
  • Buy it here: Steam
  • Play this if you like: the tabletop version of the game, the X-Wind Miniatures tabletop game

Gameplay:

Aeronautica Imperialis is what seems to be a very faithful adaptation of the eponymous tabletop game, offering the same experience of intense tactical dogfights between squadrons of fighter aces. So, if you miss playing with your tiny planes during lockdown, this game is a good alternative

Warhammer 40,000: Dakka Squadron -Flyboyz Edition

  • Genre: Arcade action flying game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Orks, Imperium, Necrons (probably more)Play this if you like: Crimson Skies, arcade shooters
  • Price: € 16,79
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

I only tried the demo of this, but it’s a very arcade-y shooting game where you control an ork fighter plane (with all the wonky weaponry that implies) in fast-paced and dizzying battles against various enemies. It’s actually a lot of fun, but difficult to control, and you definitely shouldn’t play it if you have any problems with vision-induced vertigo! Give the demo a go if it sounds like something for you.

The Horus Heresy: Legions

Genre: Collectible Card Game
Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines (of the Horus Heresy variety), Imperium, Chaos
Play this if you like: Magic: The Gathering, Gwent, Hearthstone
Price: Free to Play
Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

This is a collectible card game set during the Horus Heresy, and it has both a narrative campaign and modes where you can play against other players.

The gameplay is fun but fairly straightforward: You have a Leader card and a deck of other cards, and you play abilities and units to kill your opponent’s leader. Blizzard’s Hearthstone game is definitely its closest relative in the CCG world, so if you like that game, you’ll feel right at home.

The game is free to play, but like so many other games of its kind, you’ll have to spend real money or put in a significant time investment to get all the cards you want.


Dawn of War

  • Genre: Real-time strategy game. Build a base, train units, eliminate your opponents.
    Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Orks, Chaos Space Marines, Craftworld Aeldari (with expansions: Astra Militarum, T’au Empire, Necrons, Adeptus Sororitas, Drukhari)
  • Play this if you like: Warcraft III, Command and Conquer: Generals and similar strategy games from the same era.
  • Price: € 12,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

Dawn of War was the first great 40K real-time strategy game. You can play through campaign missions or fight against an AI or other players in skirmishes, where you build bases and fight against other factions. The game had a lot of great ideas for its time, such as the option to buy specific wargear for each of your units, but it does feel very dated now, and I would recommend playing Dawn of War II if you want something similar that feels more modern.

Dawn of War II

  • Genre: Real-Time Strategy game: Collect resources, train units and fight your enemies in tactical battles
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Orks, Tyranids, Craftworld Aeldari (and with expansions: Chaos Space Marines, Astra Militarum)
  • Play this if you like: Company of Heroes
  • Price: € 19,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

Dawn of War II, along with its great expansions Chaos Rising and Retribution, is the gold standard of the series. It plays on a smaller, more tactical scale than the first game, and this is especially great in campaigns, where you can upgrade your units with new wargear between missions. Dawn of War II, along with the World War 2 game Company of Heroes from the same developer, really broke new ground in RTS game design, and it’s still great fun to play today.

Dawn of War III

  • Genre: Real-time strategy game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Orks, Craftworld Aeldari
  • Play this if you like:
  • Price: € 39,99
  • Buy it here: Steam


Gameplay:

Dawn of War III skipped some of the finer tactical details of Dawn of War II for an almost DOTA-like experience where battles were all about controlling certain objectives while churning out units, and the level design even felt a little bit like League of Legends at times with its narrow lanes and corridors.

This must have seemed like a good idea at the time of its development, since that game genre was all the rage back then, but it caused an enormous backlash from fans who expected more of what the series was known for. This means that the game’s player base is pretty small, and Dawn of War III never got any cool expansions, either.

All that being said, it’s still a beautiful 40K game, and if you can get over the fact that it’s not Dawn of War II, it’s also great fun.

Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor: Martyr

  • Genre: Action-RPG: Kill thousands of enemies, acquire loot, upgrade your character
    Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Imperial Inquisition, Astra Militarum, Chaos Space Marines (Black Legion, World Eaters, Death Guard), Drukhari, Tyranids, Craftworld Aeldari, Chaos Daemons, Adeptus Mechanicus, Space Marines, Rogue Traders, and more!
  • Play this if you like: The Diablo series, Path of Exile, action-oriented role-playing games, anything with a randomized loot system.
  • Price: € 49,99
  • Buy it here: Steam


Gameplay:

You play as an Imperial Inquisitor hunting down enemies of Mankind. A spaceship serves as your headquarters, where you can upgrade your character, sell, buy and forge new equipment, and from there, you can choose between a vast selection of missions across multiple star systems.
Each mission gives you an objective (kill specific enemies, activate terminals, rescue allies etc.) and a specific enemy faction to fight.

There is a main story and some side quests with a pretty good story and some nice special missions thrown in there. You even get to control an Imperial Knight a couple of times!

However, the game really opens up once you have a high level character with good equipment. The end game content is pretty varied with Tarot cards that can modify the rules of a missions for greater risk and reward, as well as seasonal campaigns, co-op and much more.

It’s not the most well-polished game in the world, and sometimes animations will look wrong or your character will move in a different way than you intended to, but the core gameplay is very satisfying: Your weapons mostly feel powerful and so do your enemies, so if you play on a difficulty level that matches your skill, the game always offer a good mix of relaxation and challenge.

The game’s standalone expansion, Prophecy, introduces an Adeptus Mechanicus inquisitor class which can summon all sorts of minions, which is a fun change of playstyle, but it’s not essential, and the main game is still being supported with patches and new features.

Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine

  • Genre: Third Person Action game – shoot, chop and stab your way through enemies as a superpowered Space Marine.
    Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Orks, Chaos Space Marines (and others in supporting roles)
  • Play this if you like: Max Payne, Remnant: From the Ashes, Star Wars: The Force Unleashed
  • Price: € 19,99
  • Buy it here: Steam


Gameplay:

Space Marine deserves a spot in the Hall of Fame of Warhammer games that actually realise the potential of the subject matter. You play as a bad-ass Ultramarine who fights through levels filled with Orks to carve up with your chainsword and bolter fire, and it’s all completely over the top and very, very 40K. The gameplay is a bit dated today, and the sort of third person shooter game genre that it belongs to is almost gone from the gaming scene, but there’s really no other game that screams 40K like this one, and the campaign is still worth playing.

Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus

  • Genre: Turn-based strategy: Take turns moving your fighters and outwit your opponent.
    Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Adeptus Mechanicus, Necrons
  • Play this if you like: the XCOM series
  • Price: € 29,99
  • Buy it here: Steam


Gameplay:

Mechanicus is a perfect example of how to do the 40K license justice as a video game. There’s no shortage of fan service to the IP: You play as the gloriously weird Adeptus Mechanicus as they investigate the tombs of the terrifying Necrons, and the game is full of details from the 40K setting in its animations, weapons, dialogue and story. This is true of most licensed Warhammer games.

What Mechanicus does on top of this is what makes it special. It takes the special characteristics of the two factions it has pitted against each other, the cyborg customisability of the Adeptus Mechanicus and the immortal unstoppability of the Necrons and builds on it to make a very tight, challenging and engaging turn-based strategy game that can compete with the best in a very popular genre. I would recommend it to gamers who like turn-based strategy games but don’t care about the 40k universe, and that’s a rare thing in the world of Warhammer video games.

Warhammer 40,000 Gladius – Relics of War

  • Genre: 4X Grand Strategy game – build cities, explore and claim resources, fight wars against other civilisations.
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Orks, Astra Militarum, Space Marines, Necrons (and with DLC: T’au, Tyranids, Chaos Space Marines, Craftworld Aeldari, Genestealer Cults as neutral units)
  • Play this if you like: The Civilization series, Age of Wonders series, Endless Legend
  • Price: € 33,39
  • Buy it here:Steam

Gameplay:

This is a solid 4X strategy game where you play as an iconic 40K faction trying to take over a planet by fighting against neutral forces, wildlife and enemy factions. It plays a lot like other 4X games with the one exception that there’s no diplomacy with other factions. After all, why would there be? In the grim future of 40K, there is only war.

The game has a good amount of depth, and factions feel distinct – I loved deploying tons of drones as the T’au in their expansion, for example. The graphics are very nice for a 4X game as well.

That being said, it’s still mainly a game you should play if you like one of the factions represented in the game, since there are too many great non-Warhammer 4X strategy games out there already, and Gladius is merely “solid”.

Warhammer 40,000: Eternal Crusade

  • Genre: Third Person Multiplayer shooter
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Craftworld Aeldari, Orks, Chaos Space Marines
  • Play this if you like: Planetside II (but this is much less ambitious)
  • Price: sort of Free to Play
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

This is a weird one. Eternal Crusade is built on a great idea: Online shootouts between players fighting for 4 different 40K factions. It sounds like something that can’t go wrong, but the controls just feel wrong, the graphics are dated, and according to recent reviews, the game seems pretty much dead. There’s a free version you can try out, though, so don’t take our word for it.

Warhammer 40,000: Sanctus Reach

  • Genre: Turn-based Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Wolves, Orks (and with DLC: Chaos Daemons and Astra Militarum)
  • Play this if you like: Fantasy General and other army-focused strategy games.
  • Price: € 27,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

A tactical turn-based strategy game where Space Wolves fight Orks, and the great thing about it is that it goes for great detail in the depiction of those two factions rather than having a couple of dozen different factions like some other Warhammer games. The tactics gameplay is solid and fun, but it looks like the upcoming Warhammer 40,000: Battlesector is the spiritual successor to this game, so if you want the most up to date version (including Primaris marines!) you might want to wait for that instead.

Warhammer 40,000: Armageddon

  • Genre: Turn-Based Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Astra Militarum, Orks
  • Play this if you like: Fantasy General
  • Price: € 36,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

This is an old school hex-based strategy game, but I must admit I was surprised to see how fun it is to play! I played the Ork expansion, but the gameplay is the same: You move a ton of units against the enemy from a semi-isometric perspective, and there’s just a lot of destruction and mayhem going on. The standard price for the game is completely insane by today’s standards, though, so buy it on sale.

Battlefleet Gothic: Armada

  • Genre: Real-Time Strategy Game
    Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Chaos, Imperium, Craftworld Aeldari, Orks (and with DLC: T’au Empire, Space Marines
  • Play this if you like: Tactical RTS games, naval warfare, space battle scenes in Battlestar Galactica or The Expanse
  • Price: € 19,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

Like the tabletop game before it, supposedly (I haven’t played the physical version) this game depicts 40K on a truly massive scale: You’re not commanding squads of infantry or tanks, but gigantic city-sized space battleships in intense galactic battles.

If you’re up for an unusual RTS experience, this game is pretty fantastic. The giant ships turn pretty slowly, and you have all sorts of weapons and actions at your disposal, so it often feels like controlling a sea battle between 17th century navies rather than a space game, but that works really well. It’s both relaxing and intense in just the right amounts.

Battlefleet Gothic: Armada II

  • Genre: Real-Time Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Imperium, Space Marines, Adeptus Mechanicus, Necrons, Chaos, Aeldari Corsairs, Craftworld Aeldari, Drukhari, T’au Empire, Orks, Tyranids
  • Play this if you like: the first Armada game, Tactical RTS games, naval warfare, space battles
  • Price: € 29,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

An upgraded and expanded version of the first Armada game with a host of new factions and a story that takes place around 8th edition of 40K, which is some of the most up to date storytelling in Warhammer PC games anywhere outside of the AOS games at the moment.

Space Hulk: Tactics

  • Genre: Turn-based Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Tyranids
  • Play this if you like: The Space Hulk board game
  • Price: € 29,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

This is an adaptation of the popular Space Hulk board game with modern graphics, but sadly I don’t know more about it since I haven’t had time to play it. Steam reviews say that it looks great and is pretty faithful to the original, but that it suffers from bugs and an absent multiplayer scene, so tread carefully.

Space Hulk: Deathwing

  • Genre: First Person Shooter with strong co-op elements
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Tyranids, Genestealer Cults, Adeptus Mechanicus (as supporting characters)Play this if you like: Left 4 Dead, Vermintide, Vermintide II
  • Price: € 29,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

Not at all unlike Vermintide II or Left 4 Dead, you and your squad of Deathwing Terminators complete objectives while fighting off wave after wave of Genestealers in dark, tight corridors.

You can equip your fighters with a variety of weapons and powers, and the gameplay itself is very intense, but the game’s graphics and controls aren’t anywhere as well done as those in Vermintide II, so unless you are only into 40K games, you should definitely play that instead.

If you want co-op in a 40K setting, another game called Warhammer: Darktide is coming out later in 2021 which follows a group of Imperium soldiers fighting off Chaos forces in an Imperial city.

Necromunda: Underhive Wars

  • Genre: Turn-based strategy game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Orlock, Escher, Goliath (and with DLC: Cawdor, Van Saar)
  • Play this if you like: the XCOM series, Mordheim: City of the Damned
  • Price: € 39,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

In this adaptation of the Necromunda skirmish tabletop game, you buy fighters for your gang, equip them with weapons and wargear, and send them on missions to fight other gangs in the dark and industrial streets of the Underhive.

The game captures some of the feel of the tabletop game: You fight over territory, each gang looks very distinct, and terrain and verticality matters a lot to the outcome of a battle. However, the gangs aren’t nearly as diverse rules-wise as they are in the tabletop game (and the extra gangs from DLC are more cosmetic than gameplay-chaning), and the game feels more like a sci-fi version of Mordheim: City of the Damned (from the same developer) than an adaptation of the tabletop version.

You might have heard a lot about the terrible AI in the game, but we’re happy to report that after a couple of patches, the AI is still a bit wonky, but nowhere near as bad as what people say in the Steam review.

If you miss playing Necromunda during lockdown, you might have a lot of fun (and some nostalgic moments) playing Necromunda: Underhive Wars – but buy it on sale.

Adeptus Titanicus: Dominus

  • Genre: Turn-based Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: various Titan legions
  • Play this if you like: Battletech, Mechwarrior
  • Price: € 24,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

The Adeptus Titanicus tabletop game really isn’t my thing, so I can’t vouch for how faithful to the original this adaptation is, but the game seems to capture some of the complexity of the original giant mech simulator which takes 40K ground warfare to a grand scale.

Warhammer 40,000: Regicide

  • Genre: Strategy Game (chess, basically)
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Orks
  • Play this if you like: Chess
  • Price: € 8,19
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

This really is a weird one. It can be played either as classic chess, but with Space Marines and Orks, or in an “extended mode” with additional rules. The graphics seem really nice, though!

Warhammer 40,000: Chaos Gate

  • Genre: Turn-based Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Chaos Space Marines
  • Play this if you like: XCOM (the original), older turn-based strategy games
  • Price: € 8,39
  • Buy it here: GOG

Gameplay:

Another old-school 40K strategy game available on GOG, but it doesn’t seem to work on Windows 10, so we can’t tell you if it’s any good!

Final Liberation: Warhammer Epic 40,000

  • Genre: Strategy game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Imperium, Orks
  • Play this if you like: Warhammer Epic 40,000
  • Price: € 5,09
  • Buy it here: GOG

Gameplay:

This is an adaptation of the Epic version of Warhammer 40,000, and it’s from 1997. It’s probably only worth getting if you have nostalgic ties to it.

Warhammer 40,000: Fire Warrior

  • Genre: First Person Shooter
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: T’au, Imperium
  • Play this if you like: Half-Life, Jedi Knight II
  • Price: € 5,09
  • Buy it here: GOG

Gameplay:

Fire Warrior is the rare 40K that’s not seen from an Imperial perspective. You play as a T’au Fire Warrior gunning down Imperial soldiers! That being said, it is also very old, and you’re probably better off waiting for Darktide or Necromunda: Hired Gun if you want to play a 40K FPS.

Warhammer 40,000: Rites of War

  • Genre: Turn-based Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Craftworld Aeldari, Imperium, Tyranids
  • Play this if you like: Fantasy General
  • Price: € 5,09
  • Buy it here: GOG

Gameplay:

An old school turn-based, hex-based 40k strategy game, but with a pleasantly unusual lineup of factions to play.

Warhammer 40,000: Battlesector

  • Genre: Turn-based Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Tyranids
  • Play this if you like: Warhammer 40,000: Sanctus Reach
  • Price: N/A
  • Buy it here: wishlist it on Steam

Gameplay:

Intense tactical battles between Blood Angels/Adepta Sororitas and Tyranids – it feels like many of the other 40K turn-based games, but has great production values and just feels good to play. If it gets updated with a few more playable factions, it could be a real 40k PC classic.

Warhammer 40,000: Space Wolf

  • Genre: Turn-based Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Chaos Space Marines (with DLC: Necrons)
  • Play this if you like: XCOM, games with a deckbuilding element.
  • Price: € 17,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

This turn-based strategy game has a really cool mechanic that makes it stand out from the other Warhammer games: You control a team of grizzled Space Wolf veterans in tactical battles, but their actions are controlled by cards you play to execute actions, so there’s a deckbuilding element to it as well.

Warhammer 40,000 Deathwatch: Enhanced Edition

  • Genre: Turn-based Strategy Game
    Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Space Marines, Tyranids
  • Play this if you like: XCOM
  • Price: € 14,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

Like Space Wolf, this is a squad-based 40K strategy game, but in this one, you fight as the Deathwatch and fight against Tyranids. We haven’t played it, but it’s a bit older than Space Wolf, is also an iOS port (so it’s originally a mobile game, but optimized for PC), and the user reviews aren’t great, so buyer beware.

Warhammer Fantasy Battles PC Games


Total War: Warhammer

  • Genre: Grand Strategy Game with turn-based faction management and real-time battles.
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Empire, Dwarfs, Greenskins, Vampire Counts, Bretonnia (and with DLC: Chaos Warriors, Norsca, Beastmen, Wood Elves).
  • Play this if you like: Total War games; the geography of the Old World of Warhammer Fantasy Battles; charging into a horde of greenskins with your knights.

Gameplay:

Control one of the classic factions of Warhammer Fantasy Battles, manage their cities, fight their wars. The game follows the classic template of the Total War series, but it really reinvented the series with much more asymmetrical factions, customisable heroes, monsters, flying units and so much more. There aren’t that many Warhammer games that are actually excellent video games in their own right, but Total War: Warhammer is engaging, beautiful and very fun to play (if you like Total War games!). Combine it with Total War: Warhammer II for the best experience.

Total War: Warhammer II

  • Genre: Grand Strategy Game with turn-based faction management and real-time battles.
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: High Elves, Dark Elves, Lizardmen, Skaven, Bretonnia (and with DLC: Vampire Coast, Tomb Kings and many others – it’s complicated if you factor in the Mortal Empires campaign and its connectivity to Total War: Warhammer I as well).
  • Play this if you like: the Total War series
  • Price: € 59,99
  • Buy it here: Steam


Gameplay:

This is where you should start if you want to play Total War: Warhammer. The campaigns in this second entry in the series are much tighter and more story-driven, and the factions are even more diverse than in the first game.

Where the game gets really interesting, though, is when you combine it with Total War: Warhammer in the Mortal Empires campaign where all the factions of both games fight each other on a giant map of the entire Old World.

Beware that you have to buy a mountain of DLC to access every feature in the game, but if you love Warhammer Fantasy and tactical real-time battles, there’s nothing quite like this.

There’s a good chance the game will tie into whatever version of the Mortal Empires campaign Total War: Warhammer III will have when it is released later this year, so it’s worth picking up this game just for that.

Blood Bowl II

  • Play this if you like: the Blood Bowl tabletop game.
  • Price: € 19,99
  • Genre: Sports/Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Humans, Orcs, Dwarfs, Skaven, High Elves, Chaos, Bretonnia

Gameplay:

It’s American football seen through the lens of the Warhammer Fantasy Universe, and it is absurd and amazing. Some teams think that playing for the ball and scoring is sort of like cheating. They would rather just beat up the other team in a “fair fight”. It is of course not allowed to bring weapon onto the battlefield, but with all rules in Blood Bowl that rule is merely a guideline. Super bloody and super fun, but some people find the game mechanics janky. It can be VERY rough for new players, so expect to spend some time learning the rules and getting smashed to bits.

Beware that there’s a ton of DLC to buy if you want more teams than the ones in the basic version, and that there’s a third instalment in the series on its way.

The first entry in the series is also available here, but it is vastly inferior (in graphics) to II and III, we’re only including it as a footnote here.

Warhammer: Vermintide

  • Genre: Melee-focused First Person action game built around co-op
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Empire, Dwarfs, Wood Elves, Skaven
  • Play this if you like: Left 4 Dead
  • Price: € 27,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

You and three other players (or bots) fight through hordes and hordes of Skaven enemies in a dark Warhammer Fantasy setting. It’s a lot like Left 4 Dead, but its close combat is a much bigger focus, so you fight with swords, axes and shields rather than shotguns and rifles (even though those are still in there in their fantasy versions).

It’s a great game and one of the first really good Warhammer action games, but the sequel is so much better than this (and so similar), that there’s no real reason to start your journey with the series with this game.

Warhammer: Vermintide II

  • Genre: Melee-focused First Person action game built around co-op
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Empire, Dwarfs, Wood Elves, Skaven, Chaos Warriors, Beastmen
  • Play this if you like: Vermintide, Left 4 Dead
  • Price: € 27,99
  • Buy it here: Steam


Gameplay:

Like the first game in the series, you and a group of friends or bots fight off endless hordes of enemies in a dark Warhammer Fantasy setting, but this time around, there’s so much more to it: You don’t only fight Skaven, but also Chaos Warriors and Beastmen, and each fighter can upgrade along different class paths that completely change how they play.

Loot is much better, there are more quests to pursue, and the recent free Chaos Wastes update gives the game a roguelite mode where you have to play a series of missions, upgrade your character as you go and then complete a final challenge to get special rewards.

Vermintide II is one of the only multiplayer games I ever play, and I don’t think that’s changing until its 40K successor Darktide comes out later this year.

Mordheim: City of the Damned

  • Genre: Turn-based Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Human Mercenaries, Sisters of Sigmar, Cult of the Possessed, Skaven (and with DLC: Undead, Witch Hunters)
  • Play this if you like: the X-COM series
  • Price: € 19,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

Buy fighters for your warband, equip and upgrade them, and fight other warbands in the ruins of Mordheim to gain territory and resources.

Mordheim is a bit janky, but still a good strategy game, and it feels great to follow your band of fighters as they gain experience, get injured and get new weapons and armour. The game is very similar to Necromunda: Underhive Wars, so if you like a dark fantasy setting, definitely play Mordheim rather than Necromunda

Warhammer: Chaos & Conquest

  • Genre: Free to Play MMO resource management strategy game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Chaos Warriors, Beastmen, many more as enemiesPlay this if you like: Clash of Clans, mobile strategy games
  • Price: free to play
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

Build and upgrade various buildings in your main base to raise armies and fight enemies. This might sound a bit like the Total War games, but beware: This game is more similar to mobile games such as Clash of Clans, so spending real money on resource packs and the like is part of the gameplay if you want to succeed.

Warhammer: Chaosbane

  • Genre: Action Role-Playing Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Dwarfs, Empire, High Elves, Wood Elves, Chaos Daemons and mortals (with DLC: Tomb Kings)
  • Play this if you like: the Diablo series, Path of Exile, the Torchlight series
  • Price: € 29,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

This is a Diablo-like action role-playing game where you fight against hordes of Chaos monsters and warriors and upgrade your character with the piles and piles of loot dropped by those enemies. It’s a great idea to place such a game in the Warhammer Fantasy universe, but it’s too bad that this is the game that came out of it: Some of the enemy designs are really cool, but the player classes just feel really repetitive and bland, and loot is rarely really fun to collect in the game.

To their credit, the developers seem really dedicated to it and kept releasing updates for it for a long time, and it’s definitely in a better state now than it was in the beginning, but it’s still one of those games you should only buy on sale when you need a break from your other action RPGs. If you want a Warhammer action RPG and don’t care if it’s fantasy or 40k, go for Warhammer: Inquisitor: Martyr instead.

Warhammer Quest

  • Genre: Turn-based strategy Game/Role-Playing Game
    Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Empire, Dwarfs, Chaos Warriors, Wood Elves, Greenskins and more.
  • Play this if you like: Darkest Dungeon
  • Price: € 14,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

This is a lovely little game where you explore caves and dungeons with a party of four heroes. You control them from a top-down perspective, so it almost feels like playing a board game, and the graphics have that timeless quality that’s very rare in video games.

The game is played on a tile-based grid, and each turn, you can move and fight with your heroes as waves of enemies attack you. Once you reach the tiles furthest away in a room, the next room opens and the game spawns new enemies, so there’s a nice gameplay mechanic of pacing your way through the dungeon in such a way that you don’t get overwhelmed. The game may look simple, but there’s some great depth to it.

There’s a lot of content locked behind a Deluxe edition upgrade, but the initial 4 heroes you get offer plenty of great fun and there’s no shortage of levels to play.

Warhammer Quest 2

  • Genre: Turn-based Strategy Game/ Role-Playing Game
    Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Empire, Dwarfs, Dark Elves, Beastmen, Skaven, and many more
  • Play this if you like: Warhammer Quest, Darkest Dungeon
  • Price: € 19,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

Warhammer Quest 2 is much like its predecessor, but it’s gotten a graphics upgrade which somehow made it look less charming, and a wealth of new classes and content, which is pretty great. I’ll always prefer the first one, but if this one’s on sale and you like tactical dungeon crawlers and the Warhammer Fantasy world, it’s still worth picking up.

Return of Reckoning

  • Genre: Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Empire, Dwarfs, High Elves, Chaos Warriors, Greenskins, Dark Elves
  • Play this if you like: World of Warcraft
  • Price: free!
  • Buy it here: Website

Gameplay:

This is an actual MMORPG in the Warhammer Fantasy Universe! That means its basically World of Warcraft: you create a character and explore a massive online world full of other players, complete quests and level up your character. The original game shut down its servers years ago, but the fan-created Return of Reckoning has brought the servers back up, and they keep updating the game to get it back into shape.

The game was pretty innovative back when it came out: You’ll recognize its “Public Quests”, where quests are open to everyone who happens to be in the same area, in the Destiny games, and it has a heavy focus on organized player-versus-player battles.

Be aware that the game is pretty old and that no new content is being developed for it, but if you like MMORPGS and dislike subscription fees, this is a really fun and nostalgic option.

Warhammer: Mark of Chaos

  • Genre: Real-time Strategy game
    Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Empire, Orks and Goblins, High Elves, Chaos Warriors (and with the expansion: Dark Elves)
  • Play this if you like: the King Arthur games
  • Price: € 8,39
  • Buy it here: GOG

Gameplay:

Mark of Chaos would probably be remembered as the good Warhammer Fantasy RTS if Total War hadn’t snatched up the licence. The game was beautiful compared to other RTS games when it was released, and true to the hobby, it featured extensive customisation of the look and colours of your units.

The game does have a history of not working on modern computers, so make sure it works with your hardware.

Warhammer: Shadow of the Horned Rat

  • Genre: Real-Time Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Empire, Greenskins, Skaven
  • Play this if you like: Warhammer: Dark Omen, it’s sequel which unfortunately hasn’t made its way to GOG yet
  • Price: € 5,09
  • Buy it here: GOG

Gameplay:

This was the first Warhammer Fantasy video game ever! It’s a tactical strategy game where you build up your army of Empire troops as you fight Skaven and Greenskins to defend the Empire.

Warhammer: Age of Sigmar PC Games


Warhammer Underwords: Online

  • Genre: deck-building/tabletop hybrid strategy game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Stormcast Eternals, Blades of Khorne (with DLC: Skaventide, Nighthaunt, Disciples of Tzeentch, Fyreslayers, Ironjawz, Deathrattle)
  • Play this if you like:
  • Price: € 8,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

A very faithful adaptation of the tabletop game, Underworlds sets you up with a warband, a deck of cards for your powers and objectives, and an opponent for a very tight game of tactics. Your goal is to score Glory Points, but part of deckbuilding is to choose which objectives you want to use to score those points, and the game generally has a bewildering complexity to what kinds of warbands you can build. If that’s your thing, there’s nothing quite like it out there, and Underworlds Online does a great job of bringing it to the PC – even though there’s a LOT of pretty expensive DLC to buy before you have all the warbands.

Age of Sigmar: Champions

  • Genre: CCG (Collectible Card Game)
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Stormcast Eternals, Blades of Khorne, Ironjawz, Idoneth Deepkin and many more
  • Play this if you like: Magic: The Gathering
  • Price: Free to play
  • Buy it here: Steam


Gameplay:

Age of Sigmar: Champions is a refreshingly different collectible card game: You build a deck of cards from a specific faction, and then you play against opponents on a game board where you have specific slots for your cards, each of them occupied by a character. This means that you play a spell, creature or skill card to one of these characters, and each character gets cool abilities if you play a specific sequence of cards to their slot.

On top of this, your cards have no “mana” cost, but you can only play two each turn or replace one of those two plays with drawing another card.

It sounds complex, and it is, but once you get the hang of it, it’s great fun, and the game is full of amazing art from the Age of Sigmar rulebooks.

The game is free to play, and you’ll probably have to pay some real money to buy enough cards to stay competitive, but you can grind your way through the game for free as well, and it’s still good fun.

Warhammer Age of Sigmar: Storm Ground

  • Genre: Turn-based Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Stormcast Eternals, Nighthaunt, Maggotkin of Nurgle
  • Play this if you like: Into the Breach
  • Price: € 39,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

Storm Ground is a turn-based tactical strategy game where you play as either Stormcast Eternals, Nighthaunt or Maggotkin of Nurgle in a rogue-lite campaign where your fighters and heroes gain experience and upgrades between missions, but if you lose your army, you have to start over from scratch.

Battles are fought on small maps, and movement and positioning is key, so if you liked Into the Breach, you’ll feel right at home.

Upcoming Games Warhammer PC Games


Warhammer 40,000: Darktide (2022)

  • Genre: First Person Co-op Shooter
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Astra Militarum, Traitor Guardsmen, Death Guard (or Poxwalkers, anyway)
  • Play this if you like: Warhammer: Vermintide II, Left 4 Dead
  • Price: N/A
  • Buy it here: Wishlist it on Steam

Gameplay:

This is the upcoming 40K version of Warhammer: Vermintide, and while we still know very little about it, it’s undeniable that putting that great co-op formula into the grimdark future and it’s greater focus on ranged weapons sounds like a great idea. This is by far the upcoming Warhammer game I am looking forward to the most!

Warhammer 40,000: Chaosgate: Daemonhunters

  • Genre: Turn-based Tactical RPG
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Grey Knights, Death Guard
  • Play this if you like: Modern X-COM games
  • Price: N/A
  • Buy it here: Wishlist it on Steam

Total War: Warhammer III

  • Genre: Turn-based Strategy Game with real-time battles
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Kislev, Chaos Daemons, Grand Cathay, more to be revealed
  • Play this if you like: the Total War series
  • Price: € 59,99
  • Buy it here: Steam

Gameplay:

This is the third and final instalment in the Total War: Warhammer series, and expectations here at Age of Miniatures are pretty high! The game focuses on the fight against the forces of Chaos, with the Daemons of Chaos themselves being properly playable for the first time, and their opponents are from niche Fantasy factions such as Kislev and the until now unseen Cathay faction.

The coolest thing about the game from a hobby perspective is that the developers are cooperating with the team at Games Workshop responsible for the The Old World miniatures game, so Total War: Warhammer III might give us the first glimpse of what some of the units from that game will look like.

Blood Bowl III (August 2021)

  • Genre: Sports/Strategy Game
  • Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Orks, Goblins, Halflings, Dark Elves, Dwarfs, Skaven, Nurgle, Elves, Humans
  • Play this if you like: Blood Bowl, tactical sports games
  • Price: N/A
  • Buy it here: Wishlist it on Steam

Gameplay:

This is the third iteration of the video game adaptation of the fantasy football tabletop game by GW. This time around, the models for the teams seem to be taken directly from recent model releases for the tabletop game, and it’s great to see that new aesthetic being rolled into the video game franchise.

Warhammer Age of Sigmar: Tempestfall (2021)

  • Genre: Virtual Reality Action Adventure
    Factions from the tabletop represented in the game: Stormcast Eternals, Nighthaunt
  • Play this if you like: VR games
  • Price: N/A
  • Buy it here: wishlist it on Steam

Gameplay:

This is a VR-only action adventure where you play as a Stormcast Eternal fighting Nighthaunt enemies, and while it looks beautiful, we don’t really know what we can expect from it gameplay-wise